In 1976 the technology that is used to brew Nespresso, some of the most expensive coffee cup for cup, was invented by the Nestle corporation in Switzerland. Since then the product has gone through many stages of development that have led us to a very popular product that brews perfect high-quality coffee with a rich layer of crema on top every single time. With coffee capsules that sell for one dollar each, Nespresso justifies its price with exceptional quality and has been becoming more and more popular worldwide in the past few years.

If you are wondering what the fuss is all about, consider how rare it is, whether it is at home or at a coffee shop, that a shot of espresso has that perfect layer of thick tan foam resting on top. This is known to coffee connoisseurs as crema, and is an indication of high quality coffee that’s been perfectly brewed. Once brewed, Nespresso has a full rich flavor and an aroma that wakes up the senses of coffee lovers, along with a beautiful layer of crema on every single cup.

There are several factors that are considered and a number of steps the Nespresso company takes to ensure that their coffee is so exceptional. These begin where one might expect, with the coffee.

The Highest Quality Coffee

Acquiring the perfect coffee is a very high priority for the people at Nespresso. It is the coffee that the customer drinks, and it is therefore the primary consideration when it comes to customer satisfaction. Second best just won’t do for Nespresso. To begin with, the firm only uses the best Grand Cru coffee. This terminology, generally used to describe the finest wines from the best regions is used by Nespresso to describe the top harvests from the greatest coffee regions in the world.

The beans used in the production of Nespresso coffee are chosen using a very specific methodology. Only the best beans from the top harvests are used, and the roasting and grinding of all of the beans is very closely monitored to make sure that the coffee comes out as it should.

In addition to this, Nespresso makes sure that it offers the variety its customers need by providing various coffees from many well known top quality sources to give their clients a wide variety of flavors and a wide variety in the level of intensity.

The coffee is sold in hermetically sealed aluminum capsules that measure the perfect amount of coffee, preserve its freshness, and are integrated optimally into the Nespresso coffee machines.

The Perfect Coffee Machines

The other thing that makes Nespresso Coffee loved all over the world is their coffee machines. The machines were created to be used with Nespresso capsules and only Nespresso capsules. There are many top quality coffee machines available, but Nespresso machines are unique.

Nespresso Machines Are Well Designed

The very first thing that you will notice about Nespresso machines if you look through a catalog or browse them in a store is that they are all very well designed. They are not only designed to make the perfect coffee but to be nice to look at. This makes them ideal for display both at home and at the office. The colors of the machines are well balanced and attractive and fit well at home or at the office.

When women are looking for a fitness program you know they’re not just looking to ‘get fit’. Anyone who understands women knows that they always have more than one reason for doing anything. As women we want to get fit, but we also want to: lose weight, halt the effects of aging, improve our tone, improve our flexibility, look younger, be more attractive to the opposite sex and even more importantly help us look attractive enough to pass inspection by other women. (more…)

So that your child does not get bored with the menu that it was just, it is time we serve a delicious special menu for the little guy. Schotel macaroni can be served to infants aged 9 months to 2 years of age.

In addition, vitamins and protein in macaroni schotel proven to be consumed by the baby. Let’s peep the recipe.

ingredients:

-200 Grams of macaroni, boiled until soft porridge or can use basic macaroni
– Half btr onion, finely chopped
– 1 clove garlic, grated
– 1 pc small carrot, grated
– 1 pc small size potato, grated
– 1 tablespoon butter for sauteing
– 2 eggs
– 1/2 cup milk formula
– 100 grams of minced chicken / beef mince

How to Make:

1. Sauté onions and garlic in butter until fragrant. Enter the grated carrots and potatoes, stirring frequently. Then enter the liquid milk, chicken / beef mince, lift.
2. Add the eggs to the material he had been beaten off. Then pour in a heat-resistant dish. Steam until cooked. Remove and let cool.

The other night I lay in bed watching Oprah’s 20th Anniversary DVD collection – a gift given to me by my best friend. Story after story of incredible people that have touched and changed the life of Oprah caused my tears of inspiration to flow. One particular person I really identified with – the story of Rudine. Rudine suffered severely from anorexia nervosa. She wanted so badly to battle and win this condition, but her emotional relationship with food and herself was so damaged.

You see, I can identify with this woman because at the age of 13, I came face to face with anorexia nervosa. It followed two very painful events in my life. Looking back, I now understand I was unable to cope with all the emotions I encountered. The anger and hatred I felt – because I could not outwardly express it – was turned inward. I began to hate my body and food became the enemy. I exercised like crazy and eventually ate only 1 small meal per day. After finally breaking that cycle, I swung to the other extreme and began to binge eat late at night. Other things replaced food until, at the age of 21, I got serious about facing and healing my emotions.

I share this with you because I think it is important to understand the devastating effects our relationship with food can have on our health. Maybe you’ve never suffered from anorexia nervosa, bulimia or obesity, but your emotional relationship with food is still worth examining. In an ideal relationship with food, you eat when you’re hungry, and you eat the healthy foods your body needs. Your body weight is healthy and you aren’t experimenting with the latest diet. Healthy eating is your way of life, and your physical wellbeing reflects that – not just your body, but your energy level, mood and internal health as well. So come on this journey with me and let’s explore some of the common emotions or situations that can trigger unhealthy eating. Pay attention to whether any of these strike home for you. If so, try substituting some of the alternatives I suggest so you can begin healing your emotional relationship with food.

Angry Eater: When you are very angry with yourself or someone else, do you turn to food? Maybe you’re mad because you made a mistake and so you beat yourself up with food. Try confronting and expressing your anger in a healthy way, and then forgive and let it go.

Stress Eater: According to Dr. Phil, “when you are under stress, your body releases hormones that automatically stimulate your appetite and set off cravings, prompting you to eat huge quantities of fattening food”. Take 15 minutes of quiet alone time or a 15 minute brisk walk instead.

Convenience Eater: You don’t have time or don’t feel like making something healthy to eat, so you grab whatever is convenient – fast food or take home, chips, donuts, etc. Keep healthy and convenient foods around the house and at the office – fruit, granola bars, Lean Cuisines, string cheese, and yogurt.

Tired Eater: Morning comes around or the afternoon energy runs out and you need a kick of sugar to keep you going. You load up on cookies, cake or other sugar snack foods and you’re off and running until you crash. Try getting 8 hours of sleep at night, exercising regularly, taking vitamins or taking a short cat nap.

No Waste Eater: Were you taught to never waste food? Were you reminded of all the poor children that had nothing to eat? Now you cannot bring yourself to leave anything on your plate or throw away any food. Put smaller portions on your plate. Give yourself permission to stop eating when you’re full. Work in a homeless shelter serving food or give food to the poor so you don’t feel guilty.

Self-Disgust Eater: You look at yourself and hate what you see; you eat or deprive yourself of food to mask the feelings you have, and so starts the cycle of abuse. Work on loving yourself in every way you can – pamper yourself, repeat positive affirmations, stick up for yourself. Invest in gaining confidence and self-esteem.

Boredom Eater: This is me. I don’t feel like doing laundry or cleaning the house. I’m tired of working, playing cars or watching TV. It’s cold outside and so I open the food cabinet. Hmmm. I wonder what I can eat. Get creative and find something fun and different to do. Switch projects and start something new. Make a phone call to a friend.

Fear of Intimacy Eater: Do you eat to hide yourself and avoid getting too close to someone? Sometimes reaching out to people can be a very scary and hard thing to do. Maybe you’ve been hurt too many times by loved ones. Seek help to heal your pain. Search for supportive and loving people that you can depend on. Take baby steps to reach out and trust someone.

Hopeless Eater: Have you just completely given up? Maybe you’ve tried too long to lose weight or given too much to your marriage, and nothing seems to change. You feel hopeless and so you just say, “Who cares? I’m just going to eat whatever I want”. Or maybe you’ve lost your appetite all together. Change your thoughts. Focus on the positive and keep a gratitude journal. Look for the bright side of everything. Search for the sunshine and you will find it.

“See Food” Eater: You know the saying, “I’m on a seafood diet. I see food and I eat it”. Are you the type of eater that constantly grazes? If the food is in front of you, you eat it without really thinking about it. You may or may not be hungry – it’s just a habit. Graze on low-fat and healthy foods. Keep the fattening foods at the grocery store. Work on being more conscious of how much food you are taking in.

Seattle; the home of Boeing, software giants, grunge music and…specialty coffee. Well, not quite. Contrary to popular belief, while Pearl Jam, Nirvana and Boeing and Oracle do indeed hail from the Pacific Northwest, modern specialty coffee has its roots much further south.

When Alfred Peet died in his sleep a few weeks ago he was a sprightly 87. He passed away peacefully hopefully dreaming of coffee trees laden with ripened cherries. While most people have never heard of him, Peet is widely recognised as being the father of modern “specialty coffee” in the industry. He was a Dutchman who became an American. He had traded tea for Lipton’s in Java, lived in Sumatra, worked in the business in New Zealand before, finally, settling down (somewhat) in the University suburb of Berkeley, California. It was at Berkeley where he founded his roastery in 1966 and Peet’s Coffee was born. Alfred Peet was passionate about coffee. His roasting exploits legendary and his ability to commentate, roast and put out fires simultaneously are famous. His experiences while living in Indonesia had given him an affinity with farmers who grew coffee, as well as a thorough understanding of the origin, the place where coffee was grown. This background, combined with his love of roasting, resulted in a place where coffee was not just a cup of Java, but something exotic, living and with a story.

From Alfred Peet’s inspirational example came many of the coffee cultures that now are household names today in America and around the world- Starbucks being the most famous of these of course. The original founders of Starbucks- Baldwin, Bowker and Ziv Seigel originally leant their roasting trade from Peet, in fact Peet roasted for them in their early years. Many others in the industry in America today also passed through the Peet’s Coffee experience. In fact when Howard Schulz purchased Starbucks, Bowker and Baldwin moved across and purchased Peets Coffee- Alfred Peet retiring to a role of Coffee Mentor for the Industry as a whole.

Today most coffee drinkers, from Surabaya to San Francisco, recognise Starbucks and its logo, but the name “Alfred Peet” often draws draws blank looks.

Specialty Coffee today is at a crossroad- an important junction in deciding which direction coffee will be heading over the next decade. In the last 10 years many new comers have entered the business. It is estimated that the global coffee sector today is valued at over US$80 billion. It is no wonder that with these revenue numbers, the industry attracts a mix of business people with mixed agendas- who often see the potential bottom line rather than education and passion as being the driving force in what they do. Traditionally the specialty coffee industry has been built on the strong foundation of sharing knowledge and experience- with the supposition that by helping each other the industry will be strongly quality focused. However a number of the more recent arrivals in the market are perhaps choosing coffee for the perceived easy profits, rather than for a real passion for coffee or its heritage. As a result many of the traditional methods of exchange are not as effective, or used as frequently as they have been in the past.

Globally Coffee is in a position where consumption is beginning to slow down and opportunities to grow coffee are becoming more difficult to find in the traditional coffee consuming markets- Europe, USA, South America and Oceania. The easy answer if to look at new emerging markets- China, India, Pakistan and Indonesia are prime targets. These countries either have low coffee consumption (Indonesian’s, for instance, consume 500gm per person per year vs. Norway’s 12kg per person per year), or have reasonable consumption, but historically are tea consumers (India). The new markets are also very suggestible to western branding- in many cases the strength of branding has been shown to be more important than the product itself. This presents a number of opportunities to strong western brands and of course new local brands to emerge. However it does not necessarily equate to long-term longevity of specialty coffee in these new frontiers.

In the more mature markets, the patterns of consumption have changed markedly over the last 15-20 years. The traditional, lower quality coffee products such as instants, are being replaced by roast and ground coffee (drips, plungers etc) and of course Espresso Based Drinks (cappuccino, latte, espresso etc). Fresh roasted coffee has many advantages over the instant coffee. It is more flavoursome and more importantly has a greater link back to where it originally came from. This means that customer awareness is also on the increase- bringing into the spotlight the actual paper trail of where the coffee comes from, who picked it, what price the grower get from it etc. To consumers in countries such as New Zealand this is very important- as generally there is a linkage between quality of coffee and the return the farmer or grower gets. The correlation is the better the return to a farmers, the better the coffee will be. Higher returns means more time can be spent in the origin country looking after the crop, pruning, selective harvesting, proper intensive drying and packing/storing the coffee once it is dried.

The role the specialty coffee industry plays in all this is very important. Retail shops that source and supply only the best coffee help to sustain the industry both upstream and downstream. This means the farmers and workers will be rewarded and the consumers will have access to quality coffee, hopefully growing the business further.

Unfortunately the reverse is gradually becoming more often the norm. Cafes, coffee shops and roasters entering the market all over the world tend to look for short-term cost advantages to try and fuel their business models. To achieve this they either buy poor quality coffee, as cheap as possible or average quality coffee…likewise as cheaply as possible. Cheap coffee equates to, at the best, very average finished product. This in turn means generally a poor perception of the place selling the coffee. This would perhaps be OK if there were not so many cafes now selling poor quality coffee. As it is it means that poor quality coffee is often accepted a being the norm- hence having the result of putting people off drinking coffee.

In many ways the industry can be seen as having come almost full circle back to where it was in the early 1970’s when instant coffee and coffee sitting on hotplates for 10 hours were seen and accepted as being normal coffee. This is what pioneers like Peet worked so hard to change. It is also why the crossroads the industry now stands at are so important.

The choices are really quite simple. For coffee to evolve and grow further there needs to be education of the retailer and the customer. The global industry is built around national organisations that play a varying role in providing advice and education to those in retail or wholesale. The Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) and the SCAE (Specialty Coffee Association of Europe) are two such organisations. However to become members of these organisations is as simple as filling out a form and paying a fee. Often the motivation of the people joining is just to get a sticker to put on their shop door, knowledge is a secondary motivator. There is talk that membership should involve some form of basic enter test and then continuing education via the internet- which would at least help to provide tools to pass information on to those drinking the coffee.

Looking at those in the industry who do things well, is also a great way of building and planning the future for specialty coffee. In the USA quality roasters and café operators such as Allegro, Blackstump Coffee and Intelligensia have taken industry standards to a new level. Buying quality coffee, hiring quality staff and imparting quality knowledge to customers buying their morning coffee has proven very successful for these companies. So much so that it is an unquestionable part of their corporate culture. All of these companies also practice something unique- they regularly visit their growers in countries such as Indonesia, Guatemala, Kenya, Brazil and Colombia. To take this one step further, they do not just visit and spend a few nights- taking photos of a grower’s coffee trees, they maintain regular contact with those growing the coffee. This approach must be seen as the future for coffee in competitive, quality driven markets. It is true relationship coffee where the roaster becomes by default part of the farmers extended family.

Passing knowledge on to those who buy a coffee everyday, and arming them with information on what type of coffee they drink, how it is grown, who grows it, when it is picked, how it gets to them gives all power to the customer. It is a very important, yet lagging piece of the future of coffee globally. Being able to learn the differences in tastes/cupping qualities has some snob quality, but more importantly it helps the buyer to differentiate between good, average and poor coffee. Here lies the problem. A successful café founded on the principles of sustainability and true coffee culture has nothing to fear from education. A café selling poor quality coffee is unlikely, or perhaps unable, to want to educate clients about quality.

A failure to address quality, education and sustainability in the business sector (from the farmer to the retail customer) will ultimately result in consumption patterns falling further. Quality issues- especially over the counter and in the cup, need to be addressed. If not unfortunately those to suffer will be the grower or origin country, rather than the retailer. With current economics a grower in Indonesia receives only around 2-5% of the cost of the average cup sold in America or Europe. If demand drops off, the Arabica business ultimately will fall back into a cycle of commodity pricing rather than specialty pricing that many quality origins now enjoy. Competition from other beverages, and lifestyle choices, compete with the disposable income that coffee comes from.

If Alfred Peet was still alive, undoubtedly he would just carry on doing what he did well and loved, roasting coffee and sharing his knowledge and experience with anyone willing, and wanting to learn and listen- a model to all of us in the industry today.

© Alun H.G Evans, Merdeka Coffee, 2007. The writer reserves all moral rights to this article. May only be reproduced.

Unique vacations are on the rise. One of the specialty vacations that many are asking about are culinary tours. Culinary tours give the vacationer the ability to taste of the culture as they indulge in the best of the foods in each culture. Open up the world as you taste of the delicacies of various regions, towns, cities, nations and continents.

Travel abroad tasting food specialties and delicate wines while diving into the lifestyle and culture of a region, area or country. Discover the taste and differences of each unique area. Taste the wine of Vienna or the sweet treats of Brazil. The unique flavors of foods from various countries and regions fill the palate with flavor and provide memories that last a lifetime.

Taste of global cuisine. Immerse yourself in the culture of the land by tasting the unique flavors and spices of each area. Interact with culture and society by enjoying a culinary vacation. Most culinary tours involve a small group that journey together tasting and enjoying. Enjoy the laughter and joy of dinning as you travel through the most popular areas and even small hidden barely known best kept secrets. Culinary vacations are filled with the art of dining and the atmosphere of community. Culinary vacations are designed with a flexibility that caters to the participants.

Tours are uniquely catered to the individual from the budding culinary artist to the expert traveler. Select your style of eating. What are you looking forward to tasting and enjoying? Within each area lies the strength of various culinary arts. Learn the methods of creating the best international and national cuisines.

United States international cuisine is tasty and unique. Take a culinary tour to enjoy the breeze of the ocean and specialty seafood dishes along the East Coast. Enjoy Colorado and the flavor of foods such as prime cuts of fresh Elk and Buffalo steaks which viewing breathtaking mountain scenes. Enjoy New Jerseys fresh produce grilled to perfected and tossed with fresh cuts of meat. Enjoy an international tour to such places as Italy, Australia or France.

The flavors of Italy may include a Roman dinner party or traveling through the country side tasting of wines, handpicked olives, perfected meats, freshly pressed olive oil, and homemade breads and pastas. The flavors of Italy cannot be imagined, they must be experienced. An Italian culinary vacation will open you up to the very best of Italian cuisine. Italy has some of the finest food in the world and some of the very best culinary artisans. Enjoy foods that have been created with art and passion. This is a unique trip that you will never forget. Your own cooking will forever be marked by a culinary vacation to Italy.

Enjoy the knowledge gained as you travel and relax. The culinary art is caught more than it is taught. Catch the art of creating foods that will speak of the joy of living. Gourmands enjoy traveling and partaking of the culture through foods. The culinary art is tasted. The freshest of natures foods are cooked to perfection in a variety of unique ways and light up the face of the gourmand. Young and old gourmands enjoy culinary vacations. Culinary vacations are also often enjoyed by couples as they travel; enjoy each others company over meals and delights, talk for hours into the wee hours of the night, and laugh together as you enjoy the very best life has to offer in culinary arts and foods.

DURING this to get a level of maturity in fish, of course, you use oil for frying, there is now a way that can be done, without using oil.

“To cook the fish, do not ever use oil but to use other materials, then you can do it, do I just use salt water,” said Heriyanto, Executive Chef at the Millennium Hotel Okezone when met at the Millennium Hotel, Tanah Abang, Central Jakarta.

According to him, the use of salt water fish will easily mature, because salt has a high compound to make the body of the fish so hard.

Well, to make it, then simply soak the fish with salt water use, with size 50 tablespoons water, and just one tablespoon of salt, then soak the fish for 30 minutes.

“With salt water soaked, then the texture of the fish will be hard to change,” he continued.

After soaking the fish removed, then cleaned the fish, then cut the fish to taste. New you can eat.

In mature fish using salt water, then do not use warm water, as hot water will kill the bacteria in fish meat, the freshness factor was so lost.

Similarly, using cold water, because cold temperatures will cause freezing, as cold curing properties.

“Simply use water temperature of 20 degrees Celsius, equivalent to room temperature,” he concluded.

If you want to use yoga for eyes there is a special meditation you can do. This meditation is specifically designed to improve myopia (near sightedness). We must, however, include the cautionary that success in the meditation depends upon the individual.

The individual must be at a certain level of awareness in Yoga. This is a tricky cat, because many people teach just the postures, and include little or even no instruction on how to handle the mind and spirit. Thus, a person might be able to do advanced postures, but still not have enough spiritual awareness to use the meditation to fix the myopia. (more…)

CUCUMBER usually placed as fresh vegetables, garnishes, salads, or pickled. Water content is 95 percent easier cucumber becomes soft if one storage.

Cucumber has a short shelf life. Most cucumbers at the supermarket sold wrapped in an airtight plastic wrap. Because, cucumber wrapped airtight resilient little longer when compared with fresh cucumbers open, as reviewed Eatbydate.

Knowing the cucumber begins to break
Mostly intact cucumbers usually have longer staying power because it still has the protective skin, which also contains nutrients. You can find out whether the cucumbers start foul by seeing and feeling directly.

The common trait is a bad cucumber damp surface. Cucumber becomes soft and slimy white surface and should not be eaten.

Maintain hygiene and food safety will help prevent rapid deterioration of food. Of course there are certain health risks if you eat a cucumber that has been damaged.

How to save the cucumber
Proper food storage is the key to extend durability. For cucumbers, it is best to keep it in one piece and unpeeled in a plastic bag in the refrigerator vegetable special shelf. Do not wash before storing it in the refrigerator.

Fresh unpeeled cucumber or cut resilient week to 10 days. For the preserved cucumber can last 1-2 weeks, while the already sliced ​​can only survive 1-2 days.

Although it is not frozen, small cucumbers and make pickles feels hard. Some benefits of proper food store than you are eating healthy foods, eating out less expensive because you will not waste food if it breaks down more quickly.

If you have a cucumber in large quantities and is likely to soon deteriorate, then cut into pieces and mix the tomato chunks and add your favorite salad dressing.